Electronics

Analog sounds and the exploration of noise

Pedals

The pedals that I make are modified reproductions of original pedals from the ’60s (Dallas Range Master and Tone Bender) that utilize germanium transistors and paper-in-oil NOS capacitors resulting in raw treble boost for the Range Master and fuzzy mud with the Tone Bender.

The pedal enclosures were sourced from www.pedalenclosures.com, from Buffalo, NY, which boast American Made enclosures (some are recycled!).

Germanium transistors with NOS paper-in-oil capacitors. Enclosure by pedalenclosures.com

Germanium transistors with NOS paper-in-oil capacitors. Enclosure by pedalenclosures.com

IMG_20121027_171751

Germanium transistor with NOS paper-in-oil capacitors. Optimized for humbuckers and Mahogany

Germanium transistor with NOS paper-in-oil capacitors. Optimized for humbuckers and Mahogany

 

Oscillators

My fascination with oscillators began in the laboratory when I questioned the effects of oscillations on crystallization of protein – the effects were going to be measured with Dynamic Light Scattering. The initial hypothesis was never developed further, but my oscillator collection grew. I primarily make mono-stable oscillators that produce triangle waves with either photoresistors or potentiometers that control the oscillation frequency. Coupled with analog effects, these oscillators can generate intriguing, intricate sound-scapes that are completely unpredictable. Finally, using a gate and/or sequencer, these oscillators can be combined to make more understandable music with plot.

 

Photoresistive opto theramin producing triangle waves.

Photoresistive opto theramin producing triangle waves.

6 opto-theramins producing triangle waves that interfere prior to leaving the circuit.

6 opto-theramins producing triangle waves that interfere prior to leaving the circuit.